My obsession.

IMG_2089

In the above picture, you will see finger-waves, and pincurls with a twist. Both are incorporated with the rollerset. This style is basically completely a wet set style, although because of the length, some hair in the back fell out of the rollers so I just curled them with my flat iron at the end to blend them.

In my last 3 months of school, the practicals I needed to work on were rollersets. So I started out begrudgingly because I hated doing them and I would just half-ass them and do basic ones. Well those were BORING, and since those were all I needed in my last 250 hours, I decided to use my imagination and creativity finally. Haha.

I would thoroughly shampoo the hair, then use setting lotion (brown gel, gives a softer finished look than normal gel and does not flake or crust) or I would use wrapping foam. I would basically just super saturate the hair with one of those products. Then I would do an exaggerated partline, and then section the hair into 3 parts (from apex to left ear and apex-right ear). The biggest front section (with the big bang) would get the finger-wave with a pincurl, curling the length of the hair up to the ear. The second front section (smaller section) I would do 3 vertical rows of pincurls with 3 pincurls in each row. The back section I would do a bricklay rollerset then wrap 2 sanek strips around it’s head to try and hold in any fly aways. Stuck it in the hooded dryer for about 30 minutes (on highest heat with most power, couldn’t play around..had to knock this shit out).

After it was dry, I would take out the pins and rollers, and using my denman brush, gently brush out the set. Backcomb the rollerset part to disguise any indentation lines or visible parts where the rollers were. Gently brush the finger-waves out. For the pincurl sectionIi would just take the hair and make 3 Horizontal sections and twist the hair backwards to almost directly above the ear. To secure the twists, stick a bobby pin in line with it but backwards (generally when one puts a bobby pin in their hair, they make the open end face the back of their head, I just reversed it and made it face, my face. I tried to hide it within the twist…although sometimes I would do 3 cornrows instead of just twists, but still the same concept). To keep the pinurls to look like pincurls at the end of the twists, I just went along with the curl that I already put there with the wet set. Secured it with hair pins. (-don’t mistake hair pins and bobby pins…hair pins are set wider apart where bobby pins are tighter)

[Using a wax, pomade, or putty will help when you twist the hair. It will help secure it better and keep everything tucked together with no fly aways.]

Finished these types of styles with Sebastian’s Shaper Fierce for the pincurls to keep their shape, Shine Define for the rollerset in the back, and then Zero Gravity for the finger-waves.

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4 thoughts on “My obsession.

  1. The plant may be a ‘salvia splendens’…
    This is how to perhaps care for them…

    Test the soil pH with a home test kit in a site that has good soil drainage and receives full sun in cool-summer climates and partial sun, preferably afternoon shade, where summer temperatures are consistently hot. Follow kit directions to determine whether the soil tests above 7.0. Red salvia is sensitive to alkaline soils, so choose another spot with a lower reading or plant your red salvia in containers filled with potting soil. Soil pH can be lowered with sulfur, but this usually takes several seasons to be effective.
    2
    Spread a 2- to 3-inch layer of finished compost across the entire planting area. Dig the compost into the soil with a garden spade to a depth of 10 inches — usually the length of the head of the spade.
    3
    Pop a red salvia seedling out of its cell or pot, maintaining as much of the soil mix around the root ball as possible, and make a small hole with a trowel in the prepared ground to the depth of the root ball. Ensure the plant is at the same level it was in its nursery container.
    4
    Plant additional red salvias 10 to 12 inches apart. In a mass planting, stagger the rows for a fuller effect more quickly.
    5
    Water the salvia thoroughly at planting and provide at least 1 inch of water per week to plants in the ground; container salvia should be watered to a depth of 2 inches. Rain, and in some areas summer fog, decreases the need for weekly watering. Salvia that is too wet or too dry does not grow well.
    6
    Fertilize a month after planting and monthly throughout the growing season with a balanced 20-20-20 fertilizer, either granular or water soluble. Apply according to package instructions based on the size of your planting.
    7
    Deadhead and remove flower stems as they fade. Salvia splendens are prone to botrytis, or gray mold, when dead stems are left on the plant — particularly in cool, damp weather. As a bonus, pinching back dead stems generates more blooms to keep your red salvia looking good until first frost.
    8
    Remove salvias by the roots when they are damaged by cold weather.

  2. Beautiful plant! The plant may be a ‘salvia splendens’ and here are some tips for caring for it…
    1
    Test the soil pH with a home test kit in a site that has good soil drainage and receives full sun in cool-summer climates and partial sun, preferably afternoon shade, where summer temperatures are consistently hot. Follow kit directions to determine whether the soil tests above 7.0. Red salvia is sensitive to alkaline soils, so choose another spot with a lower reading or plant your red salvia in containers filled with potting soil. Soil pH can be lowered with sulfur, but this usually takes several seasons to be effective.
    2
    Spread a 2- to 3-inch layer of finished compost across the entire planting area. Dig the compost into the soil with a garden spade to a depth of 10 inches — usually the length of the head of the spade.
    3
    Pop a red salvia seedling out of its cell or pot, maintaining as much of the soil mix around the root ball as possible, and make a small hole with a trowel in the prepared ground to the depth of the root ball. Ensure the plant is at the same level it was in its nursery container.
    4
    Plant additional red salvias 10 to 12 inches apart. In a mass planting, stagger the rows for a fuller effect more quickly.
    5
    Water the salvia thoroughly at planting and provide at least 1 inch of water per week to plants in the ground; container salvia should be watered to a depth of 2 inches. Rain, and in some areas summer fog, decreases the need for weekly watering. Salvia that is too wet or too dry does not grow well.
    6
    Fertilize a month after planting and monthly throughout the growing season with a balanced 20-20-20 fertilizer, either granular or water soluble. Apply according to package instructions based on the size of your planting.
    7
    Deadhead and remove flower stems as they fade. Salvia splendens are prone to botrytis, or gray mold, when dead stems are left on the plant — particularly in cool, damp weather. As a bonus, pinching back dead stems generates more blooms to keep your red salvia looking good until first frost.
    8
    Remove salvias by the roots when they are damaged by cold weather.

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